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Victorian educators will be included in mandatory reporting laws

The Victorian Government has agreed to implement the majority of the recommendations from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, including requiring early childhood educators to report suspected abuse of children.

For the first time early childhood educators will become mandatory reporters, meaning that they will be legally be required to report to child protection authorities if they have a “reasonable belief” that a child has been sexually abused.

Mandatory reporting laws and requirements vary greatly between States and Territories, and the Victorian Government’s move to include a range of occupations (including educators) marks the first State to respond to this recommendation from the Royal Commission.

Some States and Territories (such as NSW and the ACT) already have this requirement enacted in law.

“We have delivered a number of recommendations from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse to make sure that survivors of institutional child sexual abuse receive the recognition, respect and support they deserve,” said Victorian Attorney-General Martin Pakula.

More information on current mandatory reporting requirements can be found at the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

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